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Stone-tipped spears lethal, may indicate early cognitive and social skills

Attaching a stone tip on to a wooden spear shaft was a significant innovation for early modern humans living around 500,000 years ago. However, it was also a costly behavior in terms of time and effort to collect, prepare and assemble the spear. Researchers conducted controlled experiments to learn if there was a ‘wounding’ advantage between using a wooden spear or a stone-tipped spear.

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Parents, listen next time your baby babbles

Parents who try to understand their baby’s babbling let their infants know they can communicate, which leads to children forming complex sounds and using language more quickly. The study’s results showed infants whose mothers attended more closely to their babbling vocalized more complex sounds and develop language skills sooner.

Impact of cultural diversity in brain injury research

The implications for cultural diversity and cultural competence in brain injury research and rehabilitation has been the focus of recent study. Risk for brain injury is higher among minorities, as is the likelihood for poorer outcomes. More research is needed to reduce health disparities and improve outcomes among minorities with brain injury, experts say.